Bialystoker Synagogue  

Bialystoker Synagogue  .jpg
Bialystoker Synagogue  .jpg
Bialystoker Synagogue  .jpg
Bialystoker Synagogue  .jpg
Bialystoker Synagogue  .jpg
Bialystoker Synagogue  .jpg
5.00 (1 review)
7 Willett St, New York, NY 10002, ארצות הברית
7 Willett Street New York New York 10002 US

Weekly Shiurim:
Rav Singer Chevra Mishnayos Shiur: Daily between Mincha & Maariv
Mishna Berura Yomis: Daily after Maariv
Daf Yomi by Rabbi Fishelis: Sun – Thu at 8:00 PM
Mishlei Shiur: Sunday mornings, 7:45 AM
Women's Shiur in Tehillim: Monday
Rabbi Romm's Ha'amek Davar Shiur for men and women: Wednesday at
9 PM
Torah Topics: given by Rabbi Mayer Friedman. Friday mornings, 9:15 – 10:15 AM

Shabbos Shiurim:
Rabbi Romm–1 hour before Mincha
Daf Yomi–1 hour before Mincha

The Bialystoker Synagogue was organized in 1865 on the Lower East Side of New York City. The Synagogue began on Hester Street, moved to Orchard Street, and then ultimately to its current location on Willet Street, more recently renamed Bialystoker Place.

Our congregation is housed in a fieldstone building built in 1826 in the late Federal style. The building is made of Manhattan schist from a quarry on nearby Pitt Street. The exterior is marked by three windows over three doors framed with round arches, a low flight of brownstone steps, a low pitched pedimented roof with a lunette window and a wooden cornice. It was first designed as the Willett Street Methodist Episcopal Church.
In the corner of the women’s gallery there is a small break in the wall that leads to a ladder going up to an attic, lit by two windows. Legend has it that the synagogue was a stop on the Underground Railroad and that runaway slaves found sanctuary in this attic.
In 1905, our congregation, at that time composed chiefly of Polish immigrants from the province of Bialystok, purchased the building to serve as our synagogue. During the Great Depression, a decision was made to beautify the main sanctuary, to provide a sense of hope and inspiration to the community. The synagogue was listed as a New York City landmark on April 19, 1966. It is one of only four early-19th century fieldstone religious buildings surviving from the late Federal period in Lower Manhattan. Richard McBee and Dodi-Lee Hecht have both written in-depth articles about the building.
In 1988 the Synagogue restored the interior to its original facade, and the former Hebrew school building was renovated and reopened as The Daniel Potkorony Building. It is currently used for many educational activities. Our most recent project was the refurbishing of our windows.
The Synagogue has continued to be a vibrant and reputable force in the religious world. In recent years a substantial number of new families have chosen to make it their place for prayer and study.

Nice, warm synagogue. This one is among the most active in the area.
On Sundays, there are local tours that pass through this historic site. The synagogue was once a stop on the legendary Underground Railroad. At the time it was a Protestant church.
Now, a vibrant community center, the Bialystoker offers 4-5 services each weekday morning, and the full service on Shabbat.
For the curious, Bialystoker is Orthodox, and the rabbi, Rabbi Zvi Romm is a YU graduate.

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Bialystoker Synagogue  .jpg לפני 4 שנים
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Bialystoker Synagogue  .jpg לפני 4 שנים
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Bialystoker Synagogue  .jpg לפני 4 שנים
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Bialystoker Synagogue  .jpg לפני 4 שנים
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